Canberra

The third of six catch-up posts that I hope to get out in February.

Our first of four road trips this summer was to visit the nation’s capital (and a friend of ours).¬†Canberra is about a 3 hour drive from Sydney, and we figured that we could make a day trip out of it. Note to future travelers – you might want to stay the night. The three hour estimate is maybe a little short.

The drive out was quite pretty. Lots of rolling hills (bigger than England; smaller than Ontario) and sweeping tree lines. We were also treated to an ‘act of God’ (as defined in our car insurance) on the way there when the great big freezer in the sky opened up and dumped giant balls of ice all over the highway.

Look at the size of these hailstones!
Look at the size of these hailstones!
Xavier was pretty keen to give them a taste.
Xavier was pretty keen to give them a taste.

Canberra is an odd city, and feels very manufactured. The streets are built in circles, and radiate out from the parliament buildings. From the center point, the city is cut into six parts, each dedicated to a different aspect — markets, museums, parks, and so on. It’s not a super big place, and really feels like it’s just a hub for government. I’m told that it was selected as the site for the Nation’s capital because it was equidistant from the two largest cities in Australia; but, if that’s the case, then Australian geographers cannot be trusted.

During our trip we met up with Jade, a friend of ours from the American Church in Paris, who helped us through a whirlwind tour of the parliament buildings, the gardens near the old parliament buildings, and the War Memorial. We managed to snap a few pics in the gardens, but as you can see, Xavier had a lot of excess energy from all his time sitting in the car on the way up. Thankfully, The space between the new and old Parliament buildings turned out to be an awesome outlet for pent up toddler energy. Had we been there an extra day, we definitely would have hit up the botanic gardens, and some of the national museums.

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