Banksy exhibit in Amsterdam

I didn’t have many things on my tourist todo list for Amsterdam, but seeing the Banksy exhibit was probably my first, second and third priority.

Banksy is a modern day artist who rose to fame for his politically charged street art. More than just the art, Banksy was notable for their anonymity and the incredible locations of the artwork, which appeared in banks, war zones and even an elephants cage at a city zoo. Between the desire to remain anonymous, and the difficulty associated with moving the “canvas”, there have been relatively few exhibitions for someone as famous as Banksy. All the more reason I was excited to find that the Moco art museum in Amsterdam was playing host to an exhibit of collected works.

The Moco is an old house – probably a mansion by Amsterdam standards – that was vacated in 1939 and later donated for public use. The exhibit made great use of the space, using the natural light from the windows to accent some of the pieces, and placing art in slightly out of the way spaces – above the door, or a hard to see wall – so you still had the feeling of having to look to find everything (and that, perhaps, you wandered right past a piece without seeing it). It was very light on explanation though, which is also fairly true to the artists work. Consequently, I now present a few pieces with minimal explanation as well. Enjoy!

Eating my way through Europe: Herring and Heineken in Amsterdam

My flight made great time and we arrived half an hour early. With no bags and no sleep I was quick off the plane in hopes of getting in a quick nap before sightseeing. No luck though. After a short train ride to the city center I stopped in at the hotel and was told to come back at three. So, time for breakfast!

Amsterdam is small, pretty and very walkable. I had a short list of places I wanted to visit today, and all were in the southern “Museumplein” district at the south end of the city. Departing the hotel I made a beeline for a canal and had a lovely (and very quiet) morning stroll to my first stop: the Albert Cuypstraat Saturday market.

Markets were a huge part of our life when we lived in Paris. I miss shopping like this. The food is always so nicely laid out, and the vendors range from hawkers – who always have a deal on something – to afficiandos – who insist on knowing what you are cooking so they can find just the right piece. (Once, after telling a French butcher what I intended to do with a piece of meat, he outright refused to sell it to me.)


My first acquisition of the day was a giant Stroopwaffle – two thin waffles stuck together with syrup. This was a perfect snack to tide me over while I went searching for the real treasure, raw herring.


The “raw” part of raw herring is a bit of a misnomer. After being plucked from the North Sea, the herring is flash frozen (to prevent parasites) and then gutted, deboned, skinned and laid on salt for a bit. So less raw than sushi but more raw than ceviche. Traditionally it’s served with onions, sweet pickles and a tiny Dutch flag. I gather the idea is to use the toothpick to pick up the herring pieces, roll them in onion, and have a pickle chaser. 
I lucked out and stepped just outside of the market in search of coffee and found a small shop that seemed to be to fish what a deli is to pigs. I’ll make a note here so I can come back next time I’m in town. 

Mission accomplished, I left the market with a belly full of herring and wandered my way up and down the side streets of de pjip neighborhood until I found Museumplein.


Museumplein is home to several of the city’s art museums. I’d been here on my last trip to see Van Gough and taste genevar at the House of Bols. This time, I wanted to check out the Banksy exhibit at the Moco modern art museum. More on that later. 
Following the museum adventure I grabbed a crummy cup of coffee from a locale cafe and got horribly lost en route to my final destination, and only repeat visit, the Heineken Experience.



Heineken is a local brewery that grew up on the outskirts of Amsterdam. The museum has a typical brewery tour experience to it, but with a few extras that come with being a global brand. I appreciate the sections dedicated to post-prohibition growth, and the bits explaining that the founder was a chemical engineer and one of the pioneers of beer science. Previously, brewing was thought of as more similar to baking or cooking. The best part though is the view from the roof top bar at the end of the tour. 


After the tour I took the scenic route back home, passing locals relaxing in the sun all up and down the canals. I stopped in for a few snacks along the way, to keep my strength up. Amsterdam has no shortage of snacks, I suspect in part because of the local cannabis tourism. What came first, the munchies or the chorizo-manchego macarone?



On the way home I passed a Maoz Vegetarian, a falafel stop that we used to frequent when we lived in Paris. I figured I could go for some falafel, and so that made dinner for me. For dessert, Dutch apple pie. 🙂 followed by a very early bedtime and a glorious 11 hour slumber. 

Cooked Tuna Sushi


When we lived in Sydney, one of Xavier’s favorite snacks was sushi. Specifically, cooked tuna hand rolls. 

The hand roll part may be unfamiliar to folks; this is when the chef rolls a full maki style roll, and then cuts it in half instead of 6-10 pieces. It’s something I haven’t seen done often, but it’s a really convenient way to eat on the go. 

The cooked tuna thing should be familiar, but maybe not in Sushi. By cooked tuna, I mean tinned tuna, usually mixed with a bit of mayo. For whatever reason this turns out to be something you can get only in Australia. I don’t know why – it’s delicious. You all are missing out. 

Since emigrating, X keeps asking for sushi but all we can offer is kappa maki rolls instead. He’s let us know that America is letting him down, and I can’t say I blame him. 

After some long and hard searching we have finally found a place that will fill the gap. There is a conveyor belt sushi restaurant, Blue C Sushi, in Kirkland that is a fun place to visit AND will custom roll cooked tuna hand rolls for X. They also have tasty cupcakes on the conveyor belt. 🍰

I’m hoping that if we take him once a fortnight that he’ll take “one way ticket to Sydney Harbour” off of his Christmas list.

Airlie Beach

Good morning from Airlie Beach! Home of the Whitsundays, backpackers and not much else. The Whitsundays are a group of about 75 small tropical islands in northern Queensland. It’s a very popular destination for sailing (sail, drop anchor, bar-b-q, repeat) in Northern Queensland.

Sarah and Xavier had planned a sailing trip to a nearby island resort, and I was off to swim with the fishes in the Great Barrier Reef.

Unfortunately Sarah’s sailing trip was cancelled at the last minute due to boat failure. 😦 Instead, She and X went to check out the town, and the local swimming hole.

The thing with beaches in Northern Queensland is that while they are beautiful, you can’t actually swim there at this time of year. Summer is “stinger” season, and at times you can see hundreds of very nasty jellyfish floating around in port. So, local councils create elaborate swimming pools for people to go to instead. Sounds like it was fun, but without a sun shade, too sunny for sonny. He was flush by the end of day and needed a break from the heat.

One thing they did find that was super cool was a beach caravan if camels passing through a playground.

Meanwhile, I hopped on a catamaran and darted off towards the Great Barrier Reef, a big item in my bucket list. The small cat ran for two and a half ours straight out into the ocean. Somehow, here was a floating platform there with change rooms, picnic tables and a waterslide.

I paid a bit extra and took an entry level scuba diving tour through the reef. It was breathtaking. The coral wasn’t as colourful as I expected but the fish more than made up for it. At the end the guide offered to take us for another twenty minutes (or until our air ran out, whichever came sooner) but I had to pass. Scuba is fun, but I was concentrating so hard on not concentrating on my breathing (apparently thinking about it is more likely to cause panic) if actually developed a cramp. In my face. Of all the stupid things…

So, back on the luxury barge for a dip, a visit to the water slide, some food and a few snaps from inside of the underwater observatory.

What you can see is the huge number of fish that were out at the reef. I had no idea. What you can’t see is the school of silverbacked baitfish – each fish is the size I my pinkie, but the school was bigger than a city bus. Or the giant, overly friendly, ugly-fish (that’s my name, I don’t know what it was actually called) that would swim up to you if you waved at it.

This was my top pick for the trip and I wasn’t let down.

Tomorrow, we will be heading up to Cairns (rhymes with cans) to explore the Daintree rainforest.

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